Future roads will be designed with panoramic views that stimulate drivers and prevent them from nodding off at the wheel, Highways England claims

  • Highways England will attempt to make beautiful landscapes visible to motorists
  • It is making £15bn of improvements to motorways and major A-roads by 2021
  • This will enable drivers to see 'statement structures' such as Angel of the North 

Major roads will be designed to offer drivers panoramic views to reduce the number of crashes caused by fatigue, Highways England has said.

The Government-owned company will attempt to make beautiful landscapes visible to motorists as it designs £15 billion ($20 billion) improvements to motorways and major A-roads by 2021.

Enabling drivers to see 'statement structures' such as the Angel of the North in Gateshead and the Willow Man in Somerset could give them a sense of location and purpose, engineers say.

Scroll down for video 

Major roads will be designed to offer drivers panoramic views to reduce the number of crashes caused by fatigue, Highways England has said. Pictured is the green bridge over the A556 in Cheshire

Major roads will be designed to offer drivers panoramic views to reduce the number of crashes caused by fatigue, Highways England has said. Pictured is the green bridge over the A556 in Cheshire

PANORAMIC VIEWS 

Highways England will attempt to make beautiful landscapes visible to motorists as it designs £15 billion ($20 billion) improvements to motorways and major A-roads by 2021.

Enabling drivers to see 'statement structures' such as the Angel of the North in Gateshead and the Willow Man in Somerset could give people a sense of location and purpose, engineers say. 

Highways England unveiled 10 principles for the design of upcoming schemes, including making them innovative, environmentally sustainable and long-lasting. 

Highways England chief engineer Mike Wilson said: 'Creating different vistas, different environments for people to consider, is a way of stimulating the road user.

'You might argue they're safer because of it.'

Asked if he was concerned that drivers could be distracted by the scenery, Mr Wilson replied: 'They should be focused on the road. 

'But fatigue is a real challenge for road users.

'Interesting views can 'help them stay awake', he added.

Sixty-seven people were killed and 479 seriously injured in crashes on Britain's roads in 2016. 

According to the latest figures from the Department for Transport driver fatigue was a contributory factor.

Enabling drivers to see 'statement structures' could give drivers 'a sense of location and how you're making progress on your journey', Mr Wilson said.

Enabling drivers to see 'statement structures' such as the Angel of the North in Gateshead (pictured) could give them a sense of location and purpose, an engineer says

Enabling drivers to see 'statement structures' such as the Angel of the North in Gateshead (pictured) could give them a sense of location and purpose, an engineer says

The Government-owned company will attempt to make beautiful landscapes - such as Willow Man in Somerset - visible to motorists as it designs £15 billion ($20 billion) improvements

The Government-owned company will attempt to make beautiful landscapes - such as Willow Man in Somerset - visible to motorists as it designs £15 billion ($20 billion) improvements

He claimed the cost of road schemes including maintenance bills could be cut if good design is 'at the heart of the process and not a bolt-on at the end'.

Highways England unveiled 10 principles for the design of upcoming schemes, including making them innovative, environmentally sustainable and long-lasting.

Previous projects include the use of traditional dry stone walls to 'reinforce the A590's connection to the Cumbrian landscape'.

Another so-called green bridge provides a safe crossing for badgers, voles and other small animals over the A556 in Cheshire.

 

The comments below have not been moderated.

The views expressed in the contents above are those of our users and do not necessarily reflect the views of MailOnline.

We are no longer accepting comments on this article.