Mother-of-two, 51, dies in hospital two days after being diagnosed with flu that led to a bacterial infection and severe pneumonia

  • Jenny Ching, 51, went to hospital last Wednesday with bad cold symptoms 
  • She was diagnosed with flu and then developed an infection and pneumonia
  • Ms Ching died on Friday morning, leaving behind a husband and two sons 

A mother-of-two died in hospital two days after being diagnosed with the flu.

Jenny Ching, 51, and her family had assumed she was fighting a particularly nasty cold when she went to hospital last Wednesday.

Ms Ching, of Needham, Massachusetts, then developed a bacterial infection that caused severe pneumonia. On Friday morning, she died.

She normally gets a flu shot every season, but her husband Matt Ching says he's not sure if she did this season.

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Jenny Ching (pictured with her family) was diagnosed with the flu after going to hospital last Wednesday. She died two days later

Jenny Ching (pictured with her family) was diagnosed with the flu after going to hospital last Wednesday. She died two days later

'She had the flu and she also developed a bacterial infection,' he told WLWT5.

'It was really severe and caused severe pneumonia.'

He added that he is grateful for the support from friends and members of the Needham community.

'Without them, I don't know how I would be to help keep the boys going.'

Ms Ching had worked at the New Garden restaurant – a popular Chinese spot in Needham – since moving to the town at the age of 20.

Ms Ching (pictured) developed a bacterial infection that caused severe pneumonia

Ms Ching (pictured) developed a bacterial infection that caused severe pneumonia

A wake was held on Wednesday and Ms Ching was set to be buried on Thursday morning.

A friend set up a GoFundMe page to help support Ms Ching's two sons – aged seven and nine.

'Jenny was a beautiful woman with a huge heart,' a friend wrote on the page.

'She would do anything for anyone. If she wasn't greeting you with a big smile at The New Garden restaurant where she worked, she was stopping you on the street to find out how you're doing.

'She was a wonderful mom and will be truly missed by everyone who knew her.' 

Bodybuilder Kyler Baughman (pictured) died five days after contracting the flu. Doctors gave his cause of death as organ failure due to septic shock caused by influenza

Bodybuilder Kyler Baughman (pictured) died five days after contracting the flu. Doctors gave his cause of death as organ failure due to septic shock caused by influenza

Ms Ching's death was just a week after a 21-year-old bodybuilder died, five days after contracting the flu.

Kyler Baughman, from Pennsylvania, fell ill on December 23 with a cough and congested nose.

He also didn't think much of his symptoms - but was forced to come home from work on December 26.

His condition rapidly worsened and he died just 48 hours later. 

Doctors gave his cause of death as organ failure due to septic shock caused by influenza. 

FLU WREAKING HAVOC IN THE US

The flu is now widespread in 46 states in the US, affecting more than 8,500 people, according to the latest data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 

As of last week, Flu-related death rates were just under epidemic levels at 6.7 percent of all deaths in the US.

So far, 13 children have died of the flu, and in California alone it has killed at least 27 otherwise healthy adults.   

Experts anticipate this to be a particularly bad year, as the flu season came early and is far from over.    

The flu has reached widespread status in all but 6 states in the US, and nearly half of the country is seeing 'high' flu activity (red), according to the latest CDC data

The flu has reached widespread status in all but 6 states in the US, and nearly half of the country is seeing 'high' flu activity (red), according to the latest CDC data

The strain of the flu in the US this year is very similar to the so-called 'Aussie flu' and to the variation that killed 20,000 people in the US during the 2014-2015 flu season.

Vaccines against this year's particularly deadly, predominant strain, A H3N2, are estimated to only be about 30 percent effective.  

Flu shots are made from whatever strain of the virus scientists think is most likely to be common in the coming year. 

They guessed the strain correctly, but when the vaccine is developed in chicken eggs it can mutate, becoming an imperfect match for the virus it is meant to prevent. 

H3N2 is known for causing more severe flu symptoms and mutates more quickly than other strains, making it hard to predict and treat.    

 

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