Oregon man, 77, gets no jail after he tried to kill his neighbor's dogs by lacing sausage with RICIN

  • The dogs, two-year-old Bandit and five-year-old Snowflake, are American and French Brittany Spaniels  
  • Police investigators said that Michael Lynch, 77, wanted to harm the animals because he was enraged by their constant barking 
  • Lynch has lived at his Portland home for more than 20 years and never had a problem with his neighbor before trying to kill his dogs nearly two years ago
  • During the trial, the dogs' owner Richard Schmidtke said Lynch has absolutely no respect for what is socially acceptable and no moral compass

Michael Joseph Lynch (pictured) was convicted of attempting to harm his neighbor's two dogs over a four day period in July 2016 by tossing sausages spiked with ricin

Michael Joseph Lynch (pictured) was convicted of attempting to harm his neighbor's two dogs over a four day period in July 2016 by tossing sausages spiked with ricin

An Oregon man accused of trying to kill his neighbor's dogs with poisoned meat was sentenced on Wednesday to probation.

Michael Joseph Lynch was convicted of attempting to harm his neighbor's two dogs over a four day period in July 2016 by tossing sausages spiked with ricin over his fence.  

Police investigators said that Lynch, 77, wanted to harm the animals because he was enraged by their constant barking, according to The Oregonian. 

Neighbors told detectives during their investigation, however, that the dogs caused little disturbance when they were outside.

Lynch was also sentenced for putting his neighbor's health in jeopardy, who handled some of the poisonous meat by taking it from the mouth of one of the dogs. 

Richard Schmidtke said he was forced to seek urgent medical care for respiratory distress and placed on a ventilator, the Oregonian reported.  

During the trial, Schmidtke said Lynch has 'absolutely no respect for what is socially acceptable, no moral compass', calling Lynch's actions 'unconscionable'. 

'What kind of person stoops so low as to poison animals?' he added. 

Defense attorney Stephen House told the Oregonian that Lynch will abide by the court and avoid all contact with his neighbor as stipulated in the judge's ruling. 

'Mr. Lynch ... wants to live the rest of his life in peace and harmony with his neighbors,' Houze added. 

Until Wednesday's conviction, Lynch had never run afoul of the law, working as a railroad engineer for nearly 40 years.  

Dog owner Richard Schmidtke (far left) talks about his upset over the poisoning of his dogs by neighbor Michael Joseph Lynch during Lynch's plea and sentencing hearing on Wednesday, Jan. 3, 2018.
Investigators later found castor beans (pictured left) - which naturally create ricin- inside Lynch's home

Investigators later found castor beans (pictured right) - which naturally create ricin- inside Lynch's home (Richard Schmidtke pictured left)

Defense attorney Stephen House (left) represented defendant Michael Joseph Lynch (right), seen here at Lynch's plea and sentencing hearing on Wednesday, Jan. 3, 2018

Defense attorney Stephen House (left) represented defendant Michael Joseph Lynch (right), seen here at Lynch's plea and sentencing hearing on Wednesday, Jan. 3, 2018

Lynch pleaded no contest to attempted first-degree animal abuse, second-degree animal abuse, two counts of recklessly endangering another person and possessing a loaded firearm in public, the Oregonian reported.    

The dogs, two-year-old Bandit and five-year-old Snowflake, are American and French Brittany Spaniels who Schmidtke said were bred for bird hunting. 

Schmidtke said that he has lived at his Portland home for more than 20 years and never had a problem with his neighbor until he tried to feed his dogs poisoned meat.   

Schmidtke told the Oregonian that Snowflake first became ill on July 10. 

'She immediately started vomiting,' Schmidtke said, saying the dog was near death when he brought her to the veterinarian. 

'She couldn't move,' Schmidtke said. 'Her eyes were rolled back. She was in desperate trouble.'

Schmidtke only realized what his neighbor was doing when he caught him in the act while he was sitting on his back patio.

Laboratory tests later proved the meat was laced with ricin, leading investigators to issue an arrest warrant for Lynch. 

Investigators later found castor bean- which naturally create ricin- inside Lynch's home. They also discovered a container labeled as having botulism inside. 

Schmidtke also filed a $400,000 civil lawsuit against Lynch, and the case is still headed toward trial, according to the Oregonian.  

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