The man aged THIRTY with Alzheimer's: Father is given just years to live after disease killed his dad at the age of 36 - and his toddler twins have a 50% chance of inheriting it

  • Daniel Bradbury inherited the condition from his father who died aged just 36
  • Such sufferers usually die at the same age as the person they inherited it from
  • Mr Bradbury suffers from short-term memory loss, confusion and poor balance
  • As it is an inherited condition, his children have a 50% chance of suffering later
  • Mr Bradbury and his girlfriend wish to go on a family holiday to Disney World 

A father diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease has been given just years to live and is shocked to discover his toddler twins have been given a 50 per cent chance of inheriting the condition.

Daniel Bradbury, 30, who is unable to work, was diagnosed in September last year and is believed to be one of the youngest people in the country to suffer from early-onset Alzheimer's.

Mr Bradbury, from Hucknall, Nottinghamshire, inherited the condition from his father Adrian, who died at just 36 from the disease. People with this type of Alzheimer's generally have the same life expectancy as the person they inherited it from. 

As Mr Bradbury, who was diagnosed shortly after the twins were born, has an inherited disease, there is a strong chance his 18-month-old toddlers, Lola and Jasper, will also suffer in later life.

His girlfriend and the children's mother Jordan Evans, 29, who cares for Mr Bradbury full time, said: 'We were very shocked and devastated by the diagnosis. It was particularly difficult to hear that the children have a chance of getting it too.'

Expected to die young, Mr Bradbury, who suffers from short-term memory loss, confusion and balance problems, wishes to make lasting memories for his family by raising £10,000 for the trip of a lifetime to Disney World Florida.

Daniel Bradbury (pictured), who suffers from Alzheimer's, has been given just years to live and is shocked to discover his toddler twins (pictured Jasper and Lola) have been given a 50 per cent chance of having the condition (pictured with his girlfriend Jordan Evans)

Daniel Bradbury (pictured), who suffers from Alzheimer's, has been given just years to live and is shocked to discover his toddler twins (pictured Jasper and Lola) have been given a 50 per cent chance of having the condition (pictured with his girlfriend Jordan Evans)

Daniel Bradbury, who is unable to work, was diagnosed in September last year and is believed to be one of the youngest people in the country to suffer from early-onset Alzheimer's

Daniel Bradbury, who is unable to work, was diagnosed in September last year and is believed to be one of the youngest people in the country to suffer from early-onset Alzheimer's

As Mr Bradbury, who was diagnosed shortly after the twins were born, has an inherited disease, there is a strong chance his children will also suffer in later life

As Mr Bradbury, who was diagnosed shortly after the twins were born, has an inherited disease, there is a strong chance his children will also suffer in later life

WHAT IS EARLY-ONSET ALZHEIMER'S DISEASE? 

Early-onset Alzheimer's disease affects people under 65 and makes up around 4% of the condition's sufferers.

It occurs due to a single gene, which affects around 600 families worldwide. 

Symptoms include memory problems that interfere with everyday life, confusion, disorientation, personality changes, language problems and sight difficulties.

These symptoms get worse over time.

Most cases are not inherited but are thought to be brought on by a combination of genetic and environmental factors.

There is no cure. Treatment focuses on managing symptoms.    

Source: Alzheimer's Research UK & Alzheimer's Society

'We were shocked and devastated'  

Mr Bradbury was told he may have the condition when Ms Evans was four months pregnant in early 2016, but decided not to get tested at the time.

Yet, shortly after the twins' first birthday, his symptoms started getting more severe, prompting him to get diagnosed. 

Mr Bradbury suffered from the condition for more than a year before his diagnosis.

Ms Evans, a former NHS worker, said: 'We had a suspicion something was not right but were praying that it was not this.

'We were very shocked and devastated by the diagnosis. 

'It was particularly difficult to hear that the children have a chance of getting it too.

'We try and have some non-Alzheimer's days when we do not talk about it.' 

He inherited dementia from his father Adrian (pictured), who died at just 36 from the condition

He inherited dementia from his father Adrian (pictured), who died at just 36 from the condition

He will likely die in his 30s as a sufferer's life span usually matches those they inherited it from

He will likely die in his 30s as a sufferer's life span usually matches those they inherited it from

Ms Evans, the twins' mother, says learning they may  suffer makes it all even more devastating

Ms Evans, the twins' mother, says learning they may suffer makes it all even more devastating

He noticed symptoms when Ms Evans was four months pregnant but was not tested at the time

He noticed symptoms when Ms Evans was four months pregnant but was not tested at the time

Mr Bradbury and Ms Evans want to create lasting memories of him for their children

Mr Bradbury and Ms Evans want to create lasting memories of him for their children

HOW MANY PEOPLE SUFFER FROM ALZHEIMER'S DISEASE? 

Around 850,000 people in the UK suffer from dementia, which is a group of symptoms that affect memory and reasoning. Alzheimer's disease falls under this.

More than one million people are predicted to suffer by 2025 and over two million by 2051.

Dementia is thought to be on the rise as people are living longer and growing awareness make diagnoses more common.  

Early-onset dementia, which occurs in people under 65, affects more than 40,000 people in Britain.

Of those over 65, 7.1 per cent suffer.

Worldwide, nearly 36 million people have dementia but up to 28 million may be undiagnosed.

Source: Alzheimer's Society

'I do not know how long I have' 

Mr Bradbury and Ms Evans are hoping fundraising money will give them and their twins memories together before his time runs out.

He said: 'I try not to think about it. I live day by day with both good days and bad days.

'It does not just affect me, it affects everyone around me as well.

'I do not know how long I have 'til it takes a real hold on me. I want to be as much of a dad as I can for as long as I can be.

'As my memory fades I am hoping to create lasting memories for my partner and our children so that one day they can look back on the videos and photos of us all together and cherish them.'

The couple, who met 12 years ago, have started a Justgiving page to raise money to take their children to Disney World.

They are hoping to go by the middle of this year as they 'do not know how he will be in six months'.

Ms Evans said: 'We want to raise as much as possible to have a trip as a family and create memories for the kids.

'We were hoping to take them when they were older and can remember it, but that is not a possibility now.

'It will mean a lot to be happy as a family, to look back and remember all the good times that we had.'   

The money raised will also help Mr Bradbury tick other things off his bucket list, such as sky diving with his brothers.

Clare Walton, research communications manager at the Alzheimer's Society, added: 'Dementia is not a natural part of ageing and it doesn't just affect older people.

'Over 40,000 people under 65 in the UK have dementia, including people in their 30s and 40s. The needs of younger people with dementia are very different to those of older people and there is a shortage of age appropriate services in the UK.

'Alzheimer's Society is currently funding research which we hope will improve diagnosis and support for people with younger onset dementia.'

Donate towards the family's holiday here.  

Mr Bradbury suffers from short-term memory loss, confusion and balance problems

Mr Bradbury suffers from short-term memory loss, confusion and balance problems

Ms Evans was an NHS worker but now cares for Mr Branbury full time

Ms Evans was an NHS worker but now cares for Mr Branbury full time

The couple want to create memories so the family can look back and remember the good times

The couple want to create memories so the family can look back and remember the good times

They hope to raise enough money to have a trip of a lifetime to Disney World Florida

They hope to raise enough money to have a trip of a lifetime to Disney World Florida

Mr Bradbury also hopes to do a sky dive with his brothers (pictured) before he deteriorates 

Mr Bradbury also hopes to do a sky dive with his brothers (pictured) before he deteriorates 

PARENTS HEARTBREAK AS THEIR DAUGHTERS ARE THE YOUNGEST EVER DEMENTIA SUFFERERS AFTER BEING DIAGNOSED AGED JUST SIX AND 10 YEARS OLD 

Two sisters are thought to be the youngest ever victims of dementia after being struck down by the disease at just six and 10 years old.

Older sister Emily, who died at just 21, was diagnosed with a form of Alzheimer's disease when she was just six years old, while her sister Sarah, now 19, developed the condition at 10.

Sarah, who is also expected to die young, is no longer able to walk, talk or write her name and is forced to communicate via an iPad.

Mother Lisa, 48, from Letchworth, Hertfordshire, said: 'It has robbed us of so much.

'We cried and cried for all the things [they] would be robbed of...boyfriends, a husband, children. The list was endless.'

A rare genetic disorder, known as Niemann-Pick Disease Type C (NP-C), is thought to have caused the sisters' dementia and affects just 700 people worldwide. 

Two sisters are the youngest ever dementia sufferers - one has since died and the other, Sarah (bottom middle), is unable to walk or talk. Mother Lisa (left), 48, from Letchworth, said: 'It has robbed us of so much' (also pictured are the girls' father, Mark, also 48, and brother Harry, 20)

Two sisters are the youngest ever dementia sufferers - one has since died and the other, Sarah (bottom middle), is unable to walk or talk. Mother Lisa (left), 48, from Letchworth, said: 'It has robbed us of so much. 'We cried and cried for all the things [they] would be robbed of' (also pictured are the girls' father, Mark, also 48, and brother Harry, 20)

'When Emily died, a part of me died with her'

Sarah stopped being able to walk or talk at just 17 and is now forced to communicate via an iPad.

Last month, she stopped being able to write her name, prompting her parents to leave notes around the house that say 'My name is Sarah'. 

Lisa, a former nanny who became the girls' full-time carer along with her husband Mark, also 48, said: 'It has robbed us of so much. It's such a cruel disease, one of the worst illnesses I have ever heard of.

'If anyone developed dementia we expected it to be me or Mark when we reached old age.

'We never expected our young girls to need constant care.'

The loss of their daughter Emily devastated the couple and caused Lisa to question her faith.

She said: 'No one should have to bury their child. When Emily died, a part of me died with her. We are so devastated by her loss and miss her every day.

'Luckily having Sarah gets me up every day. We don't know what the future holds for her, but we known that our time with her is special.

'I used to have a faith but having two children with this disease has stopped that.

'With one you think you can manage and they've been sent by God for you to look after, but two? That's simply too cruel.' 

Emily, who died at just 21, was diagnosed with a form of Alzheimer's disease when she was just six years old

Emily, who died at 21, was diagnosed with a form of Alzheimer's when she was just six

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